Poison Oak

Now that berries are fruiting and plants are looking lush and growing happily in the sun, a lot of red flagging can be found along high traffic areas of the park. This flagging indicates nearby Poison Oak, Toxicodendron diversilobum. 

Poison Oak growing in direct sun is the easiest to identify. It's waxy, 'puffy' leaves stand out among the rest of the foliage.

Poison Oak growing in direct sun is the easiest to identify.
Its waxy, ‘puffy’ leaves stand out among the rest of the foliage.

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With moderate-full shade, Poison Oak may not ever develop leaves. The vines can be easily identified, though, if you know what to look for. The branches coming off the vine typically are stubby, warty and light tan in color.

With moderate-full shade, Poison Oak may never develop leaves.
The vines can be easily identified, though, if you know what to look for.
The branches coming off the vine typically are stubby, warty and light tan in color.

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Poison Oak can also grow similarly to native blackberry, trailing along the ground.

Poison Oak can also grow similarly to native blackberry, trailing along the ground.

Please be aware that if Poison Oak has never caused a reaction for you, this does not mean you are immune.

Two crews have been exposed to Poison Oak on the site and experienced varied reactions, from none at all to severe. Each time a person is exposed, their immunity to the oil (urishiol) is weakened.  If you have not had a reaction after exposure, it means you haven’t been exposed to it enough for your body to produce a reaction yet. Whether or not the plant has leaves, or whether or not it is still living/growing, does not determine if the oil is present.

March Training!

Every year, WCC supervisors and crew members get three weeks of training at Ft. Worden State Park, near Port Townsend, WA.

The first week is NMOT (New Member Orientation and Training) in October, where we all learn about how to make the most of our year in WCC. NMOT classes included Civic Engagement, Living on a Budget, Salmon 101, Sexual Harassment Awareness/Prevention, Conflict Resolution and we all became CPR/First Aid certified!

The next two weeks, in March and June, are more intensive. We get to attend classes on two choices (one per week) from the following subjects:

  • Ethnobotany
  • Forestry Basics
  • GPS and GIS
  • Grant Writing
  • Hazardous Waste Operator (Hazwoper)
  • Renewable Energy Technology
  • Rigging Applications
  • Search and Rescue
  • Swiftwater Rescue and Safety Ropes
  • Sustainable and Low Impact Development
  • Watershed Restoration and Wetlands
  • Wilderness Advanced First Aid (WAFA) Certification
  • Wilderness Survival
  • Wildland Firefighter (Red Card)
  • Wildland Pumps and Saws
  • Woodworking at the Port Townsend School of Woodworking
We can also choose to train for a Wilderness First Responder (WFR) Certification, which takes up both weeks.
Click here for course descriptions
 

March Training

3/18-21, 2013

Sunrise over the sound from Fort Worden

Sunrise over Puget Sound from Fort Worden

Watershed Restoration and Wetlands class, learning about wetland delineation

Watershed Restoration and Wetlands class, learning about wetland delineation

Surveying the Dosewallips River for proper functioning conditions

Surveying the Dosewallips River for proper functioning conditions

Jen, making her way through root wads near the Duckabush River

Jen, making her way through root wads near the Duckabush River

Woodworking instructors, Steve and Greg, demonstrating how to use a drawknife and shave horse

Woodworking instructors, Steve Habersetzer  and Greg Kossow, demonstrating how to use a drawknife and shave horse to build a stool

Kyle using a crosscut saw with another crew member to cut a Douglas Fir log down to the right height for our stool legs

Kyle using a crosscut saw with another crew member to cut a Douglas Fir log down to the right height for our stool legs

Splitting logs to make stool legs

Splitting logs to make stool legs

Sawing a plank of wood to make a stool seat

Sawing a plank of wood to make a stool seat

Sara, using the shave horse and draw knife to shape a stool leg

Sara, using the shave horse and draw knife to shape a stool leg

Davis, using a spoke shave to round of the edges of the seat for his stool

Davis, using a spoke shave to round of the edges of the seat for his stool

What do you do if you finish your woodworking project early? You make woodwind instruments, of course!

What do you do if you finish your woodworking project early?
You make woodwind instruments, of course!

Davis, Sara, and Kyle, with their finished stools! (And a bat and flute..)

Davis, Sara, and Kyle, with their finished stools! (And a bat and flute..)

The woodworking class decided to build a bench during the last two days of training

The woodworking class decided to build a bench during the last two days of training

Voila! Bench complete!

Voila! Bench complete!

Amanda, splinting Colin's leg as part of her WFR homework

Amanda, splinting Colin’s leg as part of her WFR homework

Amanda, Colin, and Ali, staging Colin's injury as a fall down the stairs

Amanda, Colin, and Ali, staging Colin’s injury as a fall down the stairs

Ali and Amanda, showing off their splinting skills while Colin plays a very convincing patient

Ali and Amanda, showing off their splinting skills while Colin plays a very convincing patient

And last, but obviously not least, we learned at training…

evinger meme

Some Extras

Some of the beautiful things we’ve seen since we began our year on Maury Island

In the mornings, those of us from the Seattle area board the water taxi at Pier 50 to make our way to Vashon.

View from Pier 50 as we wait to board the water taxi to Vashon

A bit of WCC support from a Vashon water taxi rider who we pass on our way to the Maury Island site every week. Thank you for this sweet reminder that our work is appreciated!

A bit of WCC support from a Vashon water taxi rider who we pass on our way to the Maury Island site every week. Thank you for this sweet reminder that our work is appreciated!

Some of the many horses we see enjoying the park

Some of the many horses we see enjoying the park

Sunrise with Rainier

Sunrise with Rainier

View from the water taxi on our way back to Seattle

View from the water taxi on our way back to Seattle

Crew Members enjoying the view from the water taxi on the way back to Seattle

Crew Members enjoying the view from the water taxi

 

Planting

On February 11th, we began another phase of restoration: planting natives!

Some of the native species we are placing throughout the site include:

Red Alder (Alnus rubra)
Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menzesii)
Grand Fir (Abies grandis)
Big Leaf Maple (Acer macrophyllum)
Western White Pine (Pinus monticola)
Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis)
Madrona (Arbutus menziesii)
Vine Maple (Acer circinatum)
Douglas Maple aka Rocky Mountain Maple (Acer glabrum)
Tall Oregon Grape (Mahonia aquifolium)
Kinnikinnick (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)
Serviceberry (Amelanchier arborea)
Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus)
Salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis)
Red Flowering Currant (Ribes sanguineum)
Mock Orange (Philadelphus lewisii)
Nootka Rose (Rosa nutkana)
Peafruit Rose (Rosa pisocarpa)
Baldhip Rose (Rosa gymnocarpa)
Pacific Crabapple (Malus fusca)
Indian Plum aka Osoberry (Oemleria cerasiformis)
Cascara (Rhamnus purshiana)
Snowbrush (Ceanothus velutinus)
 

Crew members

getting plants in the ground!

Amanda

Amanda

Jen

Jen

Ian

Ian

Colin

Colin

Davis

Davis

Amanda and Ali

Amanda and Ali

Ali

Ali

Sara

Sara

Thank you to everyone from the community who participated in the Community Planting Day

MLK Service

During MLK week, WCC crews all over Washington got to choose nonprofit organizations to work with! Here’s a look at what we did!

Harsh Crew

Monday:

Today we went to Central Area Senior Center, a.k.a. “The Central” to help give their hallways a face lift  A little fresh paint went a long way!

Davis and Amanda taping off a door

Davis and Amanda taping off a door

Ali, a.k.a. Washington's most efficient tape dispenser!

Ali, a.k.a. Washington’s most efficient tape dispenser!

Sara and Amanda getting started on the hallway

Sara and Amanda getting started on the hallway

Everyone who volunteered at The Central on MLK Day!

Everyone who volunteered at The Central on MLK Day!

Tuesday:

We helped organize and clean much of the Seattle-King County Habitat for Humanity Store today!

Amanda and Eli organizing windows

Amanda and Eli organizing windows

Davis and Ali

Davis and Ali

crew store

Wednesday:

Insulate a house? We can do that too! Today, we worked with another WCC crew on a Habitat for Humanity house in West Seattle, insulating and installing vapor barrier.

Eli caulking around exterior trim

Eli caulking around exterior trim

Davis

Davis

Amanda, Sara, and Ali getting ready to tackle some insulation

Amanda, Sara, and Ali getting ready to tackle some insulation

Ali trimming vapor barrier

Ali trimming vapor barrier

Insulation and vapor barrier done!

Insulation and vapor barrier done!

Both WCC Crews at the end of our service day!

Both WCC Crews at the end of our service day!

Evinger Crew

Monday:

Ballard Habitat for Humanity RE Store! Our crew constructed display areas for the stores kitchen sets.

Matt LOVES volunteering

Matt LOVES volunteering

The crew with a finished display area awaiting cabinets

The crew with a finished display area awaiting cabinets

Tuesday and Wednesday:

We worked on Pacific Potager Farm on Vashon Island. Here we tackled an array of tasks including turning soil and weeding in greenhouses, pruning fruit trees, and preparing starter flats for tomato and squash plants.

A greenhouse with beds ready for planting

A greenhouse with beds ready for planting

Future homes for baby squash and tomato plants

Future homes for baby squash and tomato plants


*Evinger crew photos and descriptions by Jennifer McFadden

Facebook

For all the pictures that don’t make it to the blog, visit our Facebook page!

Maury Island Beach Cleanup!

Last week, crews got to participate in cleaning up styrofoam debris and trash from the shorelines of Maury Island.

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Ali, Eli, and Sara

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One crew (Harsh) worked with two IP’s, Rose Whitson and Lisa LaBudde, under the supervision of Dion Jamieson (DNR), and filled an entire truck bed in just a couple hours!

Rose Whitson and Lisa LaBudde

Rose Whitson and Lisa LaBudde

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IMAG0413 (20)More about our work at the park on the Washington DNR Blog

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